Dewberry

Scientific name: Rubus species
Abundance: plentiful
What: flowers, berries
How: open mouth, insert flower/fruit, then chew. seep flowers/young leaves in hot water for tea
Where: Sunny wastelands, borders between woods and fields. Dewberry plants grow as a low, horizontal ground cover.
When: Spring
Other uses: wine, jelly, tea, wine
Nutritional Value: carbohydrates, vitamin C; small amount of minerals and vitamins A & B
Dangers: sharp thorns

Ripe fruit.
dewberry

Unripe fruit.
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Dewberry flowers.
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Close-up of dewberry flower.
DewBerryFlowerRuler

Texas distribution, attributed to U. S. Department of Agriculture. The marked counties are guidelines only. Plants may appear in other counties, especially if used in landscaping.
DewberryTX

North American distribution, attributed to U. S. Department of Agriculture.
Dewberry

A delicious tea can be made from dewberry flowers and/or its young leaves. I recommend using the leaves rather than flowers so not to reduce the amount of fruit produced. For tea pick young healthy leaves in late morning after any dew has dried but before the sun has had a chance to evaporate the volatile flavoring oils out of the leaves. Dry the leaves before use for a richer flavor. The combination of dewberry and yaupon holly leaves makes a most excellent and vitamin-rich tea rich.

The dewberry plant creeps along the ground as a thorny vine as opposed to blackberries which grow in the form of an upright cane.

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